Circa Obsolete

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Evoking the past—enchanted images abound.

ceciliabaffo:

First row: Marie Antoinette by Elisabeth Vigee Le Brun, Georgiana by Maria Cosway
Second row: Georgiana and her daughter Lady Georgiana ‘Little G’ Cavendish by Reynolds, Marie Antoinette and her children by Elisabeth Vigee Le Brun
Third row: 
Marie Antoinette by Jean-Baptiste Gautier Dagoty, Georgiana by Thomas Gainsborough,

In July 1775, the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire visited Versailles to pay their respects to Louis XVI. It was during this visit that a close relationship developed [between Georgiana and Marie Antoinette] which lasted until the Queen’s execution in 1793. They discovered they had much in common, not only in having married a position rather than a lover, but also in their relations with their mothers. - Extract from Georgiana: Duchess of Devonshire by Amanda Foreman

(Source: sophialorens, via feminhistory)

feminhistory:

Marie-Thérèse of France aged 17 by Heinrich Friedrich Früger, c. 1795

In December 1795, seventeen-year-old Marie-Thérèse, the only surviving child of Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI, fled Paris’s notorious Temple Prison. Kept in solitary confinement after her parents’ brutal execution during the Terror, she had been unaware of the fate of her family, save the cries she heard of her young brother being tortured in an adjacent cell. She emerged to an uncertain future: an orphan, exile and focus of political plots and marriage schemes of the crowned heads of Europe. [She was] an astonishing woman whose life was shrouded in mystery, from her birth in front of rowdy crowds at Versailles, to her upbringing by doting parents, through to Revolution, imprisonment, exile, Restoration and, finally, her reincarnation as saint and matriarch. 
- Marie Thérèse: The Fate of Marie Antoinette’s Daughter, Susan Nagel

feminhistory:

Marie-Thérèse of France aged 17 by Heinrich Friedrich Früger, c. 1795

In December 1795, seventeen-year-old Marie-Thérèse, the only surviving child of Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI, fled Paris’s notorious Temple Prison. Kept in solitary confinement after her parents’ brutal execution during the Terror, she had been unaware of the fate of her family, save the cries she heard of her young brother being tortured in an adjacent cell. She emerged to an uncertain future: an orphan, exile and focus of political plots and marriage schemes of the crowned heads of Europe. [She was] an astonishing woman whose life was shrouded in mystery, from her birth in front of rowdy crowds at Versailles, to her upbringing by doting parents, through to Revolution, imprisonment, exile, Restoration and, finally, her reincarnation as saint and matriarch. 

- Marie Thérèse: The Fate of Marie Antoinette’s Daughter, Susan Nagel

feminhistory:

The crypt of Marie Antoinette, Basilica of St Denis, Saint-Denis

Upon his restoration in 1814, King Louis XVIII ordered the immediate removal of the bodies of the late King Louis XVI and Queen Marie Antoinette from their graves in Paris to the royal crypt at Saint-Denis. This sculpture, which marks Marie Antoinette’s grave, depicts the Queen without a crown, as she had never been granted a formal coronation.

feminhistory:

The crypt of Marie Antoinette, Basilica of St Denis, Saint-Denis

Upon his restoration in 1814, King Louis XVIII ordered the immediate removal of the bodies of the late King Louis XVI and Queen Marie Antoinette from their graves in Paris to the royal crypt at Saint-Denis. This sculpture, which marks Marie Antoinette’s grave, depicts the Queen without a crown, as she had never been granted a formal coronation.

feminhistory:

'Society must exact vengeance, and society must punish.' - Victor Hugo

-Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots (1542-1587); beheaded for her alleged involvement in the Babington Plot to assassinate her cousin, Elizabeth I. Elizabeth was very reluctant to sign her death warrant but understood that the removal of Mary was the only way to protect her throne from Catholic risings.

-Marie Antoinette, Queen of France (1755-1793); beheaded by guillotine during the Terror. Largely scapegoated for France’s financial problems and a victim of anti-Austrian sentiment within France. She was given one day to prepare her defence and was accused of stealing millions of livres from the French economy to send to Austria, amongst other more far-fetched claims such as sexually abusing her son, the dauphin, and planning orgies at Versailles.

-Jeanne Becu, Comtesse du Barry (1743-1793); another victim of the Terror, Jeanne was beheaded by guillotine for her association with Louis XV and allegations of her providing financial aid to French aristocrats that had fled abroad to escape the Revolution. Before her death it is believed that she buried the majority of her riches in the gardens of Louveciennes along with the head of her lover the Duc de Brissac who was butchered during the September Massacres of 1792.

-Anne Boleyn, Queen of England (1501-1536); officially executed for treason, accused of infidelity, an incestuous union with her brother and witchcraft, Anne’s death was mainly a result of her failure to give birth to a son and Henry’s reluctancy to obtain a second divorce.

feminhistory:

Oil on canvas, previously attributed to Johann Zoffany, 1779;

Dido Elizabeth Belle is depicted here with her cousin Elizabeth Murray. This painting scandalised many of it’s 18th century audience due to its portrayal of Belle, a woman of colour, in a non-subservient position. Considered to be one of the first paintings to do so, it was probably commissioned by Belle’s father Admiral Sir John Lindsay in the late 1770’s. 

feminhistory:

Oil on canvas, previously attributed to Johann Zoffany, 1779;

Dido Elizabeth Belle is depicted here with her cousin Elizabeth Murray. This painting scandalised many of it’s 18th century audience due to its portrayal of Belle, a woman of colour, in a non-subservient position. Considered to be one of the first paintings to do so, it was probably commissioned by Belle’s father Admiral Sir John Lindsay in the late 1770’s. 

(via vintagegal)

todaysdocument:

Apollo 11 Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin make the first moonwalk, on July 20, 1969.

In these clips they can been seen planting the U.S. Flag on the lunar surface and experimenting with various types of movement in the Moon’s lower gravity, including loping strides and kangaroo hops.

Moonwalk One, ca. 1970

From the series: Headquarters’ Films Relating to Aeronautics, 1962 - 1981. Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006

via Media Matters » Stepping Stones to the Moon


Happy Birthday, Ginger Rogers - July 16th, 1911 - April 25th, 1995
"The most important thing in anyone’s life is to be giving something. The quality I can give is fun, joy and happiness. This is my gift."

Happy Birthday, Ginger Rogers - July 16th, 1911 - April 25th, 1995

"The most important thing in anyone’s life is to be giving something. The quality I can give is fun, joy and happiness. This is my gift."

(Source: the-dark-city, via mothgirlwings)